Dr. Jennifer J. Harman - Gender biases - How stereotype violations affect recommendations for child custody

Gender biases: How stereotype violations affect recommendations for child custody

admin Custody, Gender Biases, Legal, Research

Decisions about child custody in family courts are largely discretionary, even in jurisdictions where shared parenting laws have been passed. Researchers have long documented how gender stereotypes affect child custody assignment, and both mothers and fathers have argued that they have faced discrimination in family court (e.g., Warshak, 1996)

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Plenary Session - Plenary Speakers Panel Discussion Day 2

Plenary Session – Plenary Speakers Panel Discussion Day 2

admin Children's Well-being, Consensus Report, Custody, Gate-keeping, Legal, New Evidence, Parental Alienation, Parenthood, Parenting Plans, Parenting Time, Quality vs. Quantity, Relocation, Research, Rights of the Child, Shared Parenting, Social Capital

Facilitator: Prof. Donald Hubin Ohio State University, USA

Speakers:
Dr. Michael Lamb Cambridge University, UK
Prof. Edward Kruk ISCP President, University of British Columbia, Canada
Dr. Malin Bergström Karolinska Institute, Sweden
Prof. Hildegund Sünderhauf Lutheran University of Applied Sciences Nuremberg, Germany
Prof. Patrick Parkinson University of Sydney, Australia
Dr. William Austin Child Custody Services, USA

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Critical analysis

Critical analysis of research on parenting plans and children’s well-being

admin Children's Well-being, Parenting Plans, Research, Shared Parenting

In order to understand children’s responses to the divorce or separation of their parents, it is important to understand normative processes of development, including the development of child-parent relationships, stress reactivity, vulnerability and resilience, as well as individual differences in these domains. In that context, it is easier to conceptualize the diverse ways in which children with different backgrounds might be affected by their parents’ separation. My presentation will review published research from this perspective.

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Dr. Malin Bergström - Shared parenting in Sweden (Where it's a norm)

Shared parenting in Sweden (Where it’s a norm)

admin Research, Shared Parenting

Malin Bergström – Sweden. Prof. Bergström is with the renowned Karolinska Institute, and possesses a unique research database due to the fact that shared parenting is the norm in Sweden. She is a clinical child psychologist with 20 years experience of clinical experience. Malin has written several books about child development, attachment theory and parenting. Her research focuses on children’s health and welfare in shared parenting arrangements. After having conducted mainly epidemiological studies on schoolaged children and adolescents, she is now studying preschool children and infants in shared parenting settings, and conducting longitudinal studies on children in different family types.

Health and wellbeing in Swedish 3-18 year olds in equal shared parenting arrangements. Equal shared parenting arrangements are common in the Nordic countries and the practice is further increasing. Our latest data collections imply that this is now the norm among separating parents. Since 2011 we have studied health and wellbeing in children in shared and single parenting arrangements and are now focusing on preschoolers. In our studies, children in shared parenting have been shown to have better health and wellbeing than those in single care arrangements. In this presentation, I will discuss these findings in relation to the Swedish norms on parent gender equity and whether our results can be generalized to children in other countries. In particular, our new findings on health and wellbeing among 3- 5-year-olds will be elaborated.

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Prof. Hildegund Sunderhauf - Legal and Social Development of Shared Physical Custody in Europe

Legal and social development of shared physical custody in Europe

admin Legal, Parenting Plans, Research

Since WW II, the role model in families has changed all over Europe from the “bread earning father and housewife”- ideal to both working parents with shared parental responsibility (legally and physically). This change has been followed by law in a first step already: Countries in Europe have changed from single legal custody after divorce to shared legal custody. As a second step law is changing from sole custody to shared physical custody. Looking at the development in several European countries makes a prognosis possible: shared parenting will be the legal presumption and getting “normal” soon. The European Convention on the Exercise of Children’s Rights and article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights guarantee for a parent and child, being together as an essential part of family life. Due to this and due to the doctrine of nondiscrimination to fathers, the parliamentary assembly of the Council of Europe passed in October 2015 Resolution No. 2079 “quality and shared parental responsibility: The role of fathers.” This resolution includes the strong recommendation to all nations to introduce into their laws the principle of shared residence following a separation, limiting any exceptions to cases of child abuse or neglect, or domestic violence.

Plenary Speakers Panel Discussion - Facilitator - Prof. Donald Hubin - Day 1

Plenary Speakers Panel Discussion – Facilitator – Prof. Donald Hubin – Day 1

admin Children's Well-being, Consensus Report, Custody, Gate-keeping, New Evidence, Parental Alienation, Parenthood, Parenting Plans, Parenting Time, Quality vs. Quantity, Relocation, Research, Rights of the Child, Shared Parenting, Social Capital

Facilitator:
Prof. Donald Hubin Ohio State University, USA

Speakers:
Dr. Richard Warshak University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA
Dr. Irwin Sandler Arizona State University, USA
Dr. Kari Adamsons University of Connecticut, USA
Dr. Sanford Braver Arizona State University, USA
Dr. Pamela Ludolph University of Michigan, USA
Dr. William Fabricius Arizona State University, USA
Dr. Linda Nielsen Wake Forest University, USA

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Dr. Sanford Braver - Does shared parenting Cause Better Out Comes For Children?

Does shared parenting CAUSE better outcomes for children?

admin Children's Well-being, Custody, Research, Shared Parenting

Does shared parenting Cause Better Out Comes For Children?

Sanford Braver – USA. Sanford Braver is Professor Emeritus at Arizona State University, where he served in the Psychology Department for 41 years. He was the recipient of 18 competitively reviewed, primarily federal, research grants, totaling over $28 million. His work has been published in nearly 130 peer-reviewed professional articles and chapters, and he is author of 3 books including Divorced Dads: Shattering the Myths.

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Dr. William Fabricius - Three Studies of Parenting Time- evidence of harm and protection

Three studies of parenting time: evidence of harm and protection

admin Children's Well-being, Parenting Time, Research

Dr. William Fabricius Arizona State University, USA I will present findings from three new studies of parenting time. 1. Infant Overnights:: When children were under 1 year of age, as well as when they were 2, more overnights with fathers up to and including 50% of overnights at both parents’ homes were associated with better long-term mother-child and father-child relationships …

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Joint physical custody vs. sole physical custody: Outcomes for children independent of parental conflict and income

admin Children's Well-being, Parenting Plans, Parenting Time, Research, Shared Parenting

Is joint physical custody (JPC) where children live with each parent at least 35% of the time linked to any better or worse outcomes for children than sole physical custody (SPC)? In what situations is JPC linked to worse outcomes? To what extent are children’s outcomes linked to their parents’ incomes and levels of conflict? When parents do not have low conflict, collaborative co-parenting relationships, are children better off if one parent has sole physical custody or if parents have shared physical custody? In 40 of 50 studies JPC children had better outcomes on measures of behavioral, emotional, and physical well-being and better relationships with parents and grandparents. In 4 studies the outcomes were equal. In 6 studies on some measures certain groups of children had worse outcomes. In all 35 studies that controlled for family income or parental conflict, JPC was linked to better outcomes. In the 20 studies that compared JPC and SPC parents’ levels of conflict at the time of separation or in subsequent years, JPC parents did not have significantly more cooperative or lower conflict relationships. Higher conflict and poorer co-parenting were not linked to worse outcomes for children in JPC than in SPC families. JPC was linked to worse outcomes when children had poor relationships with their fathers or had poor relationships with both parents while simultaneously being caught in the middle of high conflict.